Damp Proofing Windsor Castle

Windsor Castle

Windsor Castle is the largest and oldest occupied castle in the world and is one of the official residences of Her Majesty The Queen. The original castle was built for William the Conqueror around 1080. Originally part of a ring of defences around London, Windsor Castle gradually became a popular royal residence because of the good hunting in the nearby forests.

Windsor Castle had many problems with rising and penetrating damp. Newton damp proof membranes Newlath and Newtonite were used as a permanent solution to the damp problems.

Methodology

Of course with a building this size and this old, there was no question of damp proof provision being incorporated into the original building.

Both rising and penetrating damp has presented problems to the custodians of the castle over the centuries. Newton Waterproofing Systems are pioneers in the field of ‘air gap technology’ with their damp proof membranes – the air gap created by the studs on the damp proof membrane allows damp walls to dry out over time.

Protecting Windsor Castle For Sixty Years

Newton supplied their old pitch impregnated Newtonite material for remedial work at Windsor Castle in the 1950′s.
Newtons continued to develop new products and the new polypropylene membrane Newton 805 Newlath which has a mesh thermic welded to the front, has also been used in many parts of the lower regions of the castle over recent years.
  • Newlath offers a cost effective long term solution for damp problems.

  • Newtonite provides a firm key and impermeable barrier on any damp or deteriorating surface.

  • Protecting Windsor Castle For Sixty Years - Newton supplied their old pitch impregnated Newtonite material for remedial work at Windsor Castle in the 1950′s.

Result

Newlath is fixed with polypropylene plugs and it allows the area behind the material to ‘breathe’ whilst the mesh provides a firm key for plasters or renders. Newlath has provide a permanent solution for treating damp walls at Windsor Castle.

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